Manic Street Preachers recall the “bittersweet” creation of Everything Must Go (Q359 Preview)

Manic Street Preachers recall the “bittersweet” creation of Everything Must Go (Q359 Preview)

MSP-359-spreadAs Manic Street PreachersEverything Must Go marks its 20th anniversary this year, the band have spoken extensively to Q about the record’s difficult creation.

As part of a 10-page feature in our new issue, out now in print and on digital, the trio recall bandmate Richey Edwards’ disappearance on the eve of the album’s recording before reflecting on how it propelled the trio to new, unexpected levels.

“That moment when you become the biggest cult band in Britain, and then you go overground – I think a band that doesn’t experience that misses out,” bassist Nicky Wire tells Q’s John Harris.

“And it was still happy then. There was no, ‘Oh my God, we’ve got too big.’ That did come later. But we were just gliding. Gliding. The only ambivalence was that Richey wasn’t there, cos he would have looked, and sounded, and been amazing.”

For frontman James Dean Bradfield, Edwards' absence tinged Everything Must Go with a strong “bittersweetness”.

“It came crashing down the morning that A Design For Life was Number 2,” he recalls. “I remember thinking, ‘Fuck – this is bittersweet. And it’s going to be like this for a long time...’”

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