Five Songs To Hear This Week - Serpent Power, The Wealden, Gnod, Built To Spill, Breakfast In Fur

Five Songs To Hear This Week - Serpent Power, The Wealden, Gnod, Built To Spill,  Breakfast In Fur
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Sorting through the week's new singles and songs that have surfaced online over the last seven days, Jamie Skey (@jamie_skey) presents five songs you need to hear this week...

 

The phantasmagoric songwriting chemistry continues unabated between The Coral's Ian Skelly and The Zutons' Paul Molloy on Last Ape In Space, the new cosmos-probing single cut from Serpent Power's impending debut album. Is pastoral voodoo-core already an genre? Well it should be now, thanks to this tune's darkly psychedelic but blissful hypnotics.

Justin Quinn and Tim Dickinson are two in-demand session hands who've worked across the musical spectrum, jobbing for the eclectic likes of The London Sinfonietta, Jack Bruce, jazz pianist Dylan Howe and Polar Bear soundsmith Leafcutter John. They bring their vocal and arranging talents with The Wealden, a sleek, groove-laden take on post-punk, and their latest single Lifeline stitches together Talking Heads-esque idiosyncrasies and vocals that go some way to filling the void that Jeff Buckley left.

Mancunian drone worshippers Gnod exist on a similar astral plane to Andean mountain-shakers Follakzoid, but seem to probe deeper, more alien territories than their south-American counterparts. Breaking The Hex will get the acid-dropping freakscene foaming at the mouth with its machine-tooled rhythms, bleakly rendered post-punk ambience and schizophrenic saxophone squeals.

Like some of their other American indie-rock counterparts (Dinosaur Jnr, Sleater-Kinney), Built To Spill are unabashedly content to keep ploughing the same fuzz-slathered furrow, and their if-it-ain't-broke sentiment is writ large across their latest single Never Be The Same

Fey indie rockers Breakfast In Furs are more likely to gaze into the dreamscapes of their unconscious than down at their shoes, as evidenced on the technicolour layers of Portrait.